3 Pschology Tips for Better UX Design

3 psychology tips for better UX Design

Imagine a situation in which you want to window-shop ATVs (All-Terrain Vehicles). You are quite sure of your budget, make and model. You decide to browse online and visit a few websites.

Suppose you visited the sites shown below:


                                arngren.net                                                                                          amazon.com

Which site would you prefer? Amazon right?

Why? Quite simple. Arngren.net is cluttered and unappealing. Maybe, it has good deals, but the navigation is a nightmare.

The first site causes information overload. In Amazon, however, there is proper categorization and additional options of filtering. This is simple cognitive psychology at play, a concept called cognitive load – a situation where a lot of memory capacity is used to make sense of the information presented, and this affects the user experience. Psychology is the study of behavior. So, it’s vital to understand human behavior when we create website designs, and aim for high utility and usability.

This blog covers three psychological concepts that can be applied to design UX better.

Hick’s Law

When a person has to make a decision, the greater the number of choices,
the more time it will take to decide.


How is Hick’s law applicable to UX design? It helps to estimate the time it would take to make a decision in an interface’s user menu.
Consumer takes more time to decide due to abundance of choices

Ambiguity due to abundance of choices

When users are overloaded with choices, they take more time to select. So, most firms now conduct A/B tests to understand the effect of too many choices on UX. Here’s a Medium article by Digital Product Designer, Kristof Orts on the UX and Hick’s Law connect.




Takeaway: Keep It Short and Simple. Don’t barrage users with choices and multitudes of decision. A clean UX demands that the user finds the whole experience unambiguous and effortless.

Form Fatigue

Suppose you are at the fag end of a call with a support executive, when you’re requested to fill a feedback form. You agree to it and upon clicking the link find a long form, consisting of 10 questions with 4 answer options each. How motivated will you be to complete the form? Since you aren’t going to reap any benefits out of it, and the task will consume much efforts and time on your part, you might not fill the form. This is because of Form Fatigue. The benefit accrued by filling the form is way lesser than the time taken to do it.


User experiencing Form Fatigue

            User experiencing Form Fatigue


Takeaway: Avoid lengthy forms. If the length cannot be altered, make it interesting. Here’s what designer Andrew Coyle suggests.


Selective Disregard

Have you heard of the term banner blindness? You too would have indulged in it, many times.

Banner blindness or banner noise is when users disregard irrelevant content on webpages. According to this study by Infolinks, 86% of consumers suffer from banner blindness. The users have seen so many ads, that now they just do not pay attention to the ads. They have cultivated selective disregard for these sections of the webpage. Read here on why banner ads are dead.

This behavior is not limited to banners. If the user has been doggedly using only one section of the webpage, then any change in any other section is not observed at all.

86% consumers suffer from banner blindness

Banner Blindness is a form of Selective Disregard

How do designers combat selective disregard? Have you seen sites, wherein a side pop-up ad would block the screen for a few seconds and would then slink away? This is an emphasis ploy of designers, which still annoys users. So what do you suggest then, you ask?

Takeaway: Do not over-emphasize. Limit design to show only the bare essentials. Use emphasis carefully and only when it is actually required.


To make UX a delight, it is important to understand how users think and what will make their journey on your application or website easier. Cognitive psychology is an important aspect to consider before starting with UX design. After all, technology is supposed to make human life easier.

Rio Olympics 2016

Stepout2Play: Time to ring in the Rio Olympics 2016!

The Olympic torch and the craze have been re-ignited after an interval of four years. This time it is the beautiful Brazilian city of Rio De Janeiro that is hosting the sporting mega event from 05 Aug to 21 Aug 2016. There are a record 207 countries participating in the Rio Olympics 2016. And the Indian delegation is at its strongest-ever, with a 100+ member team.

So, will India fulfill the dreams of a billion and own this Olympics?

We would like to find that out too!

Join us at Stepout2Play as we deep-dive into the world of Olympics and provide updates, medal tally and fun-facts every day!

Image Source - Unsplash

Native or Hybrid – Apptions to consider


The App-mania that began in 2008, has paved the way for a billion-dollar industry. While the app economy is pegged to reach $101 billion by 2020, this year it is projected to be around $50 billion. As of June 2016, there are over 4.5 million apps available for download. (Combined figure of number of apps available for Android and iOS users). With these numbers, it is apparent that apps are here to stay and they mean big business.

Native and Hybrid Apps

There are two main types of Apps – Native and Hybrid.

Hybrid App vs Native App

                         Hybrid App vs Native App

Here’s a quick 101:

Native apps – Apps that have been developed for use on a particular platform or device. Because native apps are written for a specific platform, they can interact with and take advantage of operating system features and other software typically installed on that platform, for example Camera, GPS, etc. Technologies used are Java for Android and Objective C/Swift for iOS. Example: Facebook (Here’s Why Facebook went Native)

Hybrid apps – Apps built mostly using cross-compatible web technologies, such as, HTML5, CSS and JS and then wrapped in a native application by frameworks such as Cordova and Ionic, which provide necessary hardware plugins, like Camera, push notifications, etc. Example – Amazon Appstore (Learn about Amazon’s penchant for Hybrid)


Which one to choose? Each side has its own evangelists, listing out their pros. But we give you a comparison that will help you to quickly grasp the key points. Here’s a info-graphic of the comparison!


Native vs Hybrid App


Tabular Comparison

Criteria Native Hybrid
Quick time to market

The time taken by the app to hit the market. While native apps require a long development period, hybrid apps are faster to build





External Dependency

If your app is dependent on phone components such as Camera, GPS, etc. then it is better to go for a Native app. Hybrid apps can be built with plugins to access these features, but there will always be an external dependency on third-party developers.




Dependent on 3rdparty plugins

Development & Training Efforts

Specialist developers on Java and Objective C to work on Native Apps. However, for Hybrid app, it would suffice for the developer to be aware of HTML5, CSS and JS.


High budget


Low budget

User Experience

Users report better experience on Native apps than Hybrid apps. Native allows developers to use standardized UI controls, which makes interfaces more natural to users.


Higher UX score


Lower UX score




Now that you have a fair idea, which side are you on? Team Native or Team Hybrid?